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Japan Remembers 2011 Tsunami Which Killed 18,500

IN PICTURES: Japanese families are still rebuilding their lives along the northeast coast with a stronger sea wall, but the pain of 2011's loss remains.

Japan comes together Sunday to remember the 18,500 victims lost in a series of disasters which devastated the nation's coastal region seven years ago.

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Seven years after the tragedy, Japanese families are still rebuilding their lives along the northeast coast with a stronger sea wall and a promise from the government for support in the case of future natural disasters.
Seven years after the tragedy, Japanese families are still rebuilding their lives along the northeast coast with a stronger sea wall and a promise from the government for support in the case of future natural disasters. Photo:Reuters
Deep below the waves of the Pacific Ocean, the first of three disasters began. An earthquake measuring 9.0 triggered a monstrous tsunami with waves 30 meters high on March 11, 2011.
Deep below the waves of the Pacific Ocean, the first of three disasters began. An earthquake measuring 9.0 triggered a monstrous tsunami with waves 30 meters high on March 11, 2011. Photo:Reuters
Participants face the clock tower as they hold a moment of silence at 2:46 p.m., the time when the magnitude 9.0 earthquake struck off Japan
Participants face the clock tower as they hold a moment of silence at 2:46 p.m., the time when the magnitude 9.0 earthquake struck off Japan's coast in 2011, during a rally in Tokyo, Japan March 11, 2018. Photo:Reuters
The National Police Agency registered around 18,434 people killed from one of the three disasters, however at least 3,600 others died due to sickness or suicide following the tragedy.
The National Police Agency registered around 18,434 people killed from one of the three disasters, however at least 3,600 others died due to sickness or suicide following the tragedy. Photo:Reuters
Destruction followed the underwater earthquake, ripping buildings from their foundations, while at the Fukushima Daiichi power plant a submerged emergency power supply caused Japan to undergo the world’s worst nuclear disaster since Chernobyl.
Destruction followed the underwater earthquake, ripping buildings from their foundations, while at the Fukushima Daiichi power plant a submerged emergency power supply caused Japan to undergo the world’s worst nuclear disaster since Chernobyl. Photo:Reuters
A final death toll, dated March 1,2018, reported 15,895 killed with 62 still unidentified and another 2,539 victims missing.
A final death toll, dated March 1,2018, reported 15,895 killed with 62 still unidentified and another 2,539 victims missing. Photo:Reuters
Over 73,000 Japanese remain displaced, while 12,000 say that, though their towns have been declared safe, refuse to return out of fear of radiation.
Over 73,000 Japanese remain displaced, while 12,000 say that, though their towns have been declared safe, refuse to return out of fear of radiation. Photo:Reuters
One 70-year-old woman, Hideko Igarashi, recounted her experience saying Japan should, “never forget what we learned from the disaster. Igarashi was torn from her husband as they were attempting to escape. She was the only one to survive.
One 70-year-old woman, Hideko Igarashi, recounted her experience saying Japan should, “never forget what we learned from the disaster. Igarashi was torn from her husband as they were attempting to escape. She was the only one to survive. Photo:Reuters
The Japanese earthquake damaged three nuclear reactors at facilities north of Tokyo, raising the threat that radioactive material could leak into the region.
The Japanese earthquake damaged three nuclear reactors at facilities north of Tokyo, raising the threat that radioactive material could leak into the region. Photo:Reuters
A 12.5-meter (41-ft) concrete wall replaced a 4-meter breakwater that was washed away in the disaster as Japanese communities attempt to rebuild their lives.
A 12.5-meter (41-ft) concrete wall replaced a 4-meter breakwater that was washed away in the disaster as Japanese communities attempt to rebuild their lives. Photo:REuters
"It is my earnest hope ... that we hand down the knowledge to future generations in order to protect many people from the dangers of disasters," said Prince Akishino, the second son of Japanese Emperor Akihito.
"It is my earnest hope ... that we hand down the knowledge to future generations in order to protect many people from the dangers of disasters," said Prince Akishino, the second son of Japanese Emperor Akihito. Photo:Reuters
Published 11 March 2018
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